How to Perfect Color Your Easter Eggs With Items We are Always on Hand

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FotorCreated

I’m in easter mode and thought it would be interesting to experiment with coloring egg shells with few items we all have in the kitchen. I am a foodie after all and I love relationship between food and science.

Like spring also the humble egg has long been associated with renewal and rebirth the circle of life. There are some numerous theories of how the egg became a symbol of Easter and why we color them, but I also can guarantee of a boxed kit of neon-colored-not from-nature-dyes.

It’s really easy and there’s no set recipe. So here I will give you a few tips from what I learned.

  • Bring the water to a boil before adding your ingredients — I found this speeds up the process. Better yet, just boil your eggs in the solution!
  • Don’t rush the process! Allowing the eggs to sit in the solution overnight yielded much deeper colors.
  • The addition of vinegar and salt helps to set the color so be sure to add those to the other ingredients of your choosing.
  • Your choice to leave the solids in or remove them: To achieve a mottled or marbled effect, leave the solids in the liquid.  For a more even coloring, remove the solids before adding the eggs.
  • To make the color pop even more, rub a small amount of olive oil over the dry, colored shells. This helps them to glisten and shine, enhancing the color.
  • Both the dark blue and lighter blue in the picture above came from the same source. The difference was the amount of time they soaked in the solution.
  • In my experimenting, blueberries and pomegranate juice didn’t produce the colors I thought they would, but your results may be different if you try them.
  • Your choice to leave the solids in or remove them: To achieve a mottled or marbled effect, leave the solids in the liquid.  For a more even coloring, remove the solids before adding the eggs.
  • In my experimenting, blueberries and pomegranate juice didn’t produce the colors I thought they would, but your results may be different if you try them.
  • Saffron is terribly expensive but I lucked out and found a large quantity at a kitchen store on closeout so you might want check around at stores like Home Goods, Marshall’s, Tuesday Morning, and TJ Maxx because you never know what you might find to experiment with!
  • The amounts listed below are just suggestions — there is no right or wrong!

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1 small head red cabbage, roughly chopped

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 raw red beets, roughly chopped

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

 

 

 

 

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2 cups raw spinach

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

 

 

 

 

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2 tablespoons saffron

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

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2 tablespoons sumac

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 tablespoons turmeric

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

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1 cup red onion skins

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 cup red onion skins

4 cups water

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons table salt

I hope you have as much fun experimenting as I did!  Happy (almost!) Easter!

 

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